Monochrome Sluts

THE FAKE TIT FUND.

Life’s a bitch. Said absolutely everyone. It throws you impossibilities, injustice and incredibly difficult decisions without a minutes notice. But it’s these difficulties that make us who we are today.

None of this is news. We all know this. But what we can’t know, or for a better term, can’t possibly understand, are experiences of others that we have never had to face. What we can do, however, is learn from and listen to those around us.

Breast cancer affects 1 in 8 women. Again, we all know this. But what we don’t tend to talk about is how the women who have suffered through it and had mastectomies are affected in terms of identity. This is the area my girl, Isabel Ulatowski, is interested in and what pushed her to start The Fake Tit Fund…

What was the inspiration behind TFTF?

Someone I love, my mum’s best friend, was diagnosed with breast cancer last January, and I am happy to report she is now cancer-free. The Fake Tit Fund was inspired by those initial conversations with Suzannah surrounding her diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately her optimistic humour on “fake tits, post-op”. While the treatment of breast cancer goes beyond mastectomies and reconstruction, I was interested in this procedure because it correlated to a physical change of identity. Regardless of gender and sexuality, having one or two breasts removed to battle this disease, is a profound change.

How do you aim to support those affected by breast cancer? 

I noticed that there was movement on social media from women sharing visual stories through breast cancer treatment: including scar selfies, healing anecdotes, reconstructions, and an increase of personal and large-scale awareness platforms. TFTF aims to support this direction by developing an archive of found and submitted images, using Instagram as its platform and resource. [It will] encourage awareness and give positive attention to those sharing their difficult experiences.

Tell me more about the portrait series…

Ultimately, TFTF is a visual documentation project, with the current goal of photographing one hundred people who have undergone breast cancer treatment. The portraits will highlight the diversity of treatment, recovery, and the ensuing aesthetic decisions; remaining flat chested, having breast reconstruction, tattooing nipples, etc. With this objective, I’ve developed a few products to help sustain the project and fund the portrait series, which will be bound in print form.

You designed The Boobie Ring; how did it come about?

The Boobie Ring is designed to be a personal, durable, and unisex object that represents this change in identity and the discussion surrounding it. As the high-shine polish begins to scratch and soften, each ring will become unique to the wearer.

I work in an independent jewellery boutique, Pärla, where many of my conversations with customers and designers are about the sentimentality and longevity of an item. From the beginning, the idea was to make a silver ring that would spread awareness and evoke a conversation on these changes. But, also be something worn forever. I went to The Workbench London for support in creating the ring, where they introduced me to the process and connected me with their casting service. It was really a collaboration of an idea and their experience to help back it up. Originally, the ring had two boobs, but now it exists as a single nipple-less breast (until somebody wants to pop a ruby in there!).

To find out more, and purchase your own Boobie Ring, head to THEFAKETITFUND.COM

The Fake Tit Fund

 

The Fake Tit Fund